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Second Annual Carrboro Anarchist Bookfair

Carrboro’s second annual anarchist book fair will take place on Saturday, November 12. The book fair will run all day; other events geared towards both organizing and entertainment will take place throughout the weekend. Book lovers, firebrands, and the simply curious are all invited! Anarchists have been in the news a lot this past year, and this is a good opportunity to find out what all the hubbub is really about.

Are you involved with a radical bookshop, organizing group, or publishing project? Don’t delay–email carrborobookfair@gmail.com to reserve a table, volunteer to help, or suggest activities. The deadline for reserving tables is November 1. We’ll also be hosting workshops, presentations, and discussions–feel free to propose to offer one.

Just like last year, we are asking groups to pay a small tabling fee, but it’s important to us that tabling be accessible to groups that do not expect to make any money. 

Date: 

Saturday, November 12, 2011 - 1:00pm to 7:00pm

Location: 

Nightlight at 405 1/2 West Rosemary Street, in Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Chapel Hill vs Carrboro

Chapel Hill and Carrboro are related but they have significant differences. I love them both like family. I feel like their little brother constantly annoyed with one or the other but will remain steadfastly in love with them both 'til the day I die. Many of my fellow Chapel Hillians do not understand these differences. They see Franklin Street and Main Street in Carrboro as one long business thoroughfare. It's not. I don't mean to pick on Chapel Hill residents, both students and townies, but if you don't spend a lot of time in Carrboro you wouldn't know. The Towns have very unique histories that contain deep seated differences forged in race, class, and ideology. All fueled by the money and intellectual power of the University of North Carolina.   Yesterday I had a great conversation with several Chapel Hillians. They were a retired Town of Chapel Hill employee, a downtown business leader, a few University employees, and others who I do not know well.

50th Anniversary Commemoration of Vickers v Chapel Hill-Carrboro Schools

From the Town of Carrboro:

50th Anniversary Commemoration of Vickers v Chapel Hill-Carrboro Schools

This landmark civil rights case was rendered from the United States Federal Court in August of 1961. The case changed the course of school integration in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro District and served as a model for antidiscrimination in schools within North Carolina and across the Southeastern United States.

The program will salute the courage exhibited by Carrboro native Stanley Vickers, his parents, and a multi-racial community support system that took a bold stand for equity and justice a half-century ago.

Monday, August 29, 2011
5:30 PM until 7:00 PM
Second Floor - Century Hall
The Century Center
100 North Greensboro St.
Carrboro, North Carolina

The program is free and the public is cordially invited to attend this celebration of history and courage

Date: 

Monday, August 29, 2011 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm

Location: 

Century Center, 100 N Greensboro St, Carrboro

Farewell Forever Old Road to Durham?

Have you ever wondered why there is no rail line between Chapel Hill and Durham?  Do you want to know how we can ever create one?  Do you want to know how you can help?  Let me tell you . . . 
 

Caring for Northside's past and future

Mary Norwood Jones, along with three others, will soon be remembered with a dedication at Chapel Hill’s Peace and Justice Plaza for her civil rights work in Chapel Hill.  I knew her as the person who took care of Northside.  When I first moved to Northside in 2002, I would often see Mrs. Jones out picking up cans, paper and other debris that littered the street our homes shared.  I find myself following her example picking up trash as I walk through the neighborhood with my daughter.  Mrs. Jones also had a beautiful yard with huge hydrangea bushes and a tidy lawn.  It was again following her example that had me up on Saturday mornings pushing my lawn mower when I would rather be sleeping in and experimenting with what plants my brown thumb could keep alive in my front flower beds.  While my yard still has far to go, I keep at it, thinking about the approving words she would give me if she found me kneeling in the dirt trying to beat back crabgrass to make room for some newly planted perennials.  Along with planting tips, Mrs. Jones talked about the importance taking care of the young people and keeping the neighborhood looking nice.

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