Technology

Bricks and clicks: hybrid local businesses

Recently, I’ve gotten to know a lot of local business owners. Many of them are running retail shops selling products and services, but there are also a lot of people working in offices both downtown and in their homes. A large number of them use the Internet to make a living. The primary difference between these two groups is market size and how it makes or breaks businesses these days.

Many retail businesses have a finite market size, while an Internet business can have a global market size. Traditionally, a small retail business that sells physical products out of its building on Main Street can only sell to whomever walked in the door, meaning its total potential number of customers, or market size, is the number of people who live in the area plus a small number of tourists. However, not everyone in that group is interested in purchasing from a local business. The number of actual customers can be quite small, especially in bleak economic times like these.

Jaywalking

In Atlanta last April, a woman named Raquel Nelson, with her three children in tow, jaywalked. They were hit by a car and her four-year-old son was killed. Astonishingly, she was convicted of vehicular homicide, although public outrage has helped her secure a new trial.

This is an extreme example of something we see in Chapel Hill, Carrboro and around the country: blaming the victim when our automobile-dominated transportation system, which is inherently lethal, kills or injures someone just trying to walk from one place to another in the urban environment.

Raquel Nelson did nothing wrong when she jaywalked. In all likelihood, the motorist driving the car that killed her son was breaking the speed limit. But even if, although I find this hard to imagine, the driver was doing everything they could reasonably be expected to do, the proper conclusion in that case is that no one is to blame. It is just another tragic instance in which our insane transportation system proved to be far too dangerous.

Open Government work in CH

Sorry, Ruby. I know you wanted to write about this topic in the upcoming year, but looks like the town and UNC are a little ahead.  :)

UNC School of Information and Library Science to partner with Town of Chapel Hill
Posted Date: 6/27/2011
 
The Town of Chapel Hill is poised to benefit from a grant received by UNC-Chapel Hill's School of Information and Library Science to increase the digital curation workforce, focusing on the public information and the integration of public policy with information technology. 

New WCHL site up - new voices in the virtual public square

Solar Technology Demonstrations, Rocking High School Bands (amplified by solar power), Food Trucks, Free Workshops, and More!!!


Durham Tech’s Orange County Campus Hosts Sustainability Technologies Fair

Interested in solar technology? Learn more during Durham Technical Community College’s Sustainability Technologies Fair. The event will be held on Saturday, April 30, from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. on Durham Tech’s Orange County Campus in Hillsborough. Beginning this fall, the Sustainability Technologies program will offer both the Solar Photovoltaic certificate and the Renewable Energy diploma.  Visitors can view solar technology demonstrations and talk to solar technology professionals. Some representatives from locally-owned solar installation companies include Strata Solar, Southern-Energy Management, and Sun Dogs Solutions. Visitors may also participate in 30-minute sustainability and renewable energy workshops led by Durham Tech instructors.  Other highlights:
  • Enjoy live music from local high school bands using an amplification system powered by solar energy;
  • Learn about the new Sustainability Technologies credit programming at the Orange County Campus;
  • Find out how to apply for financial aid and admissions for Summer Term 2011 and Fall Semester 2011 courses; 
  • Enjoy a delicious meal prepared by one of our locally owned and operated food truck vendors
The Solar Photovoltaic certificate is designed for licensed electricians, those pursuing an electrical degree, and those who are working in facilities services under the supervision of an electrician. The certificate instruction includes both energy use analysis and solar photovoltaic system installation. 

The new Renewable Energy diploma includes electrical and math courses for students without previous electrical experience. The diploma program includes work experience with a local company. The renewable energy diploma may be completed in five semesters. This new program will position Durham Tech and Orange County as leaders and models in the state for developing innovative and practical green training programs and initiatives. 

 

For the most up-to-date event information please go to the event webpage: 

For more information, contact Carlo Robustelli at 919-536-7238, ext. 4202, or robustec@durhamtech.edu.

Date: 

Saturday, April 30, 2011 - 10:00am to 2:00pm

Location: 

Durham Tech's Orange County Campus, 525 College Park Road, Hillsborough NC

Pages

 
 

Content license

Creative Commons License
All content on OrangePolitics is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 United States License.

 

Donate to OP

 
Zircon - This is a contributing Drupal Theme
Design by WeebPal.