The town has posted 2020 theme survey results, but the formatting is terrible. Can anyone help me get this into readable text?

Array

4 Comments

Ruby Sinreich's picture

Strange PDF structure

This PDF would be much more helpful if the responses were in a list or table rather than on separate pages. This shouldn't be so hard, but i"ve been unable to extract, copy, or transform the document.

Ruby Sinreich's picture

Thanks

Thank you, James! Let's start my pasting the text here, in all its clunky glory, so at least people can skim it. If I have time I'll try to edit together better, but I have a few other assignments for CH2020 that I need to tend to first. 


Survey Responses
Town and Gown
     Is there anything you would like to add to the theme "Town and Gown"? Why?


= Page 1 =
Survey Responses
Town and Gown
     UNC can't be expected to solve the housing shortage. Market forces drive up rental and property prices.
Everything we do (CH2020) makes this a better place to live. he result? More people want to move here, with predict-
able efects on property values. Denying this economic reality doesn't help solve the problem.


= Page 2 =
Survey Responses
Town and Gown
     Previous comments apply here - student housing (on and of campus) could welcome gardening op-
portunities. he Campus Community Garden is a wonderful example of mutual support and innovative action.  As a
graduate, employee, homeowner, and regular transit and alternate transportation user and supporter, I celebrate our
town/gown relationship as mutually beneicial.


= Page 3 =
Survey Responses
Town and Gown
     Seems ine as written.


= Page 4 =
Survey Responses
Town and Gown
     Partner more with the university to address problems (e.g., expand community gardens; work with
university to do an experiment with contraception for deer - Gonacon; have university donate tickets for events to teen
mentoring programs and lower-income families)


= Page 5 =
Survey Responses
Town and Gown
     I would like he Town to serious ask what it can do to enable the lourishing of University generated
businesses in our community. We need a priority on job creation and capital creation.


= Page 6 =
Survey Responses
Town and Gown
     I would like to make sure partnerships to the University help contribute to the tax base. Since they do
not pay taxes, we need to make sure when there is opportunity we keep joint ventures on the private tax rolls.


= Page 7 =
Survey Responses
Town and Gown
     We need to continue to foster our relationship with UNC.  hey are our biggest asset.


= Page 8 =
Survey Responses
Town and Gown
     make the circle easier to read-jeez who wants to spin their head around to understand what you are say-
ing


= Page 9 =
Survey Responses
Town and Gown
     Focus on the beneits of greater density w/i Chapel Hill. he importance of Carolina North to our com-
munity in the future


= Page 10 =
Survey Responses
Town and Gown
     I am frustrated that the only reference to the public schools is a one-word mention in Town and Gown
referring to partnerships for better exposure.  (Truthfully, I'm not sure what the full sentence means.)  he number one
reason people move to Chapel Hill is for the public schools.  I know the Town does not govern or pay for the schools
but I would really would like to see language that acknowledges that the Town makes land use decisions that have a
signiicant impact on the size of the student population and therefore the budgets of the schools and the County.  his
has an impact on the quality of the services provided by the schools and the County.  here is a link between promo-
tion of dense development and the County's inability to pay for library or other services used by the citizens of Chapel
Hill.  If the county wasn't constantly catching up to student growth exacerbated by increasingly dense development,
then funding for other important services such as health care for the poor, social services, and mental health might be
more adequate to meet the needs of the Chapel Hill citizens who need it. So... I imagine a Chapel Hill that carefully
considers the impact of its decisions on the quality of services provided by Orange County and the public schools.


= Page 11 =
Survey Responses
Town and Gown
     I'd like to see more attention paid to Town/Gown partnerships for "life-long learning"--not just to im-
prove citizens' job skills or their access to cultural events, but to nurture learning for its own sake, whether the subject
is Dutch painting of the 17th century, current political issues, foreign languages, or garden design.  I don't believe the
current oferings from UNC's Friday Center, Carrboro Arts Center, Orange County branch of Durham Tech, CHICLE,
Town's Park and Rec. and Public Library, etc. come close to meeting the adult learning needs of the community.    Also,
the second "University" is mispelt in your paragraph above!


= Page 12 =
Survey Responses
Town and Gown
     services to new immigrants


= Page 13 =
Survey Responses
Town and Gown
     At one of the earlier CH2020 programs, it was mentioned that K-12 schools would be considered in the
Town and Gown heme.  I�m not sure if this is still the intent and I think there will be some overlap, perhaps with the
�Place for Everyone� theme. Regardless, I thought I would share some comments.    I�m very supportive of K-12 edu-
cation and that is one of the reasons I moved to CH.  I wanted to live in a community that prioritizes education and
I wanted to live in a community with families where parents take a genuine interest in their children�s education.    I
live in CH and pay CH Taxes, Orange County Taxes, and CH-Carr school taxes. I am happy to contribute to CH/Carr
School tax.    I know of families who live in CH (ie, pay CH-Carr school taxes) who choose to send their children to
private schools or who choose to home-school their children. Many CH residents do not have children.    Every CH
resident should have to help support the schools, but support should also be provided by anyone taking advantage
of the schools who don�t pay the CH-Carr school tax or who don�t pay CH property taxes.    I take the bus to campus
everyday and I notice that there are many school children boarding school buses at apartment complexes.  his is at
the time of day when elementary school children are boarding the school buses.  I understand from others that high
school students whose families live in apartment complexes are also boarding school buses.      Are landlords of apart-
ment complexes contributing to the schools, and if yes, is an appropriate amount from apartment complexes contrib-
uting to the public school system?    Next, approximately 50% of my property taxes for Orange County goes toward
education.  Given I live in CH and pay CH-Carr school tax, it is not clear why I am also paying Orange County educa-
tion taxes.    Finally, how do the funds from the NC Education Lottery get distributed to CH-Carr schools?


= Page 14 =
Survey Responses
Town and Gown
     that the growth of the university is done in a way that supports the economic viability and development
of a vibrant downtown and healthy neighborhoods.


= Page 15 =
Survey Responses
Town and Gown
     Please acknowledge that Chapel Hill would not be Chapel Hill if it weren't for the University of North
Carolina.  Can we add something about making a welcoming environment for alumni and parents to return, and po-
tentially stay and invest?  Can we talk about support of faculty?  Being a partner in recruiting high-quality faculty?


= Page 16 =
Survey Responses
Town and Gown
     he University needs to assume a more collaborative posture with the town regarding students--hous-
ing and cars in particular.  I was recently looking for housing for someone without a car and the options were appall-
ing.  I understand what landlords are up against but the University needs to be a more active partner with the Town
Council and Chamber of Commerce and Realtors to provide adequate housing for students and employed people.


= Page 17 =
Survey Responses
Town and Gown
     rename this University Partnership or University Relationships, Town and Gown sounds ambiguous.  
his group actually is one of the most important but overlooked.


= Page 18 =
Survey Responses
Town and Gown
     I hope the University is involved in the planning process.


= Page 19 =
Survey Responses
Town and Gown
     A lot of these ideas don't seem speciic to the University. hey are town-wide issues, which have a spe-
cial implication or responsibility for UNC as a partner in our community.


= Page 20 =
Survey Responses
Nurtuting our Community
     Please see previous comments in support of community gardens to bring sustainability, resource con-
servation, and public well-being to all citizens.  I would like to include dark skies - reducing light pollution through ef-
fective measures (ordinances, education) as a natural resource to be conserved. his is also an economic (putting light
only where it's needed, billions in electricity currently wasted in the U.S.) and public health (less glare, safer public
spaces, less light trespass) issue.


= Page 21 =
Survey Responses
Nurtuting our Community
     1) Planning strategies should accomodate growth and protect the environment.


= Page 22 =
Survey Responses
Nurtuting our Community
     he more we can do to get people out of their cars, the better.


= Page 23 =
Survey Responses
Nurtuting our Community
     Do not only consider bow-hunting as a measure for reducing deer population but pair up with univer-
sities (NC State vet school, zoology/biology depts) to try out the deer contraceptive Gonacan


= Page 24 =
Survey Responses
Nurtuting our Community
     Denser development is not incompatible with and, in fact, can help support ecological sustainability.


= Page 25 =
Survey Responses
Nurtuting our Community
     his is all lovely language, but a problem is that Orange County has not responsibly addressed its solid
waste disposal problem. he community of Chapel Hill needs to confront the Orange County Commissioners about
their failure to resolve this essential community need.


= Page 26 =
Survey Responses
Nurtuting our Community
     I agree with what is stated. I would like to add in a cost efective/sustainable manner. Regulations cost
money. Protecting land costs money. By reducing available land it makes all develop able land more expensive.


= Page 27 =
Survey Responses
Nurtuting our Community
     We do not need to ship our gargabe elsewhere.  We need to learn the realities of being enviromentally
friendly and think diferently than we ahve in the past.


= Page 28 =
Survey Responses
Nurtuting our Community
     make the circle easier to read-jeez who wants to spin their head around to understand what you are say-
ing


= Page 29 =
Survey Responses
Nurtuting our Community
     Addressing the blight of long vacant, un-used commercial property. Studies have shown that long-
standing vacant, un-used space has a detrimental efect on a community's health and well being.


= Page 30 =
Survey Responses
Nurtuting our Community
     Needs a diferent title.  "Steward of natural resources"     "Nurturing our community" means something
bigger.


= Page 31 =
Survey Responses
Nurtuting our Community
     income diversity. he status quo in Chapel Hill is designed to run the middle class out of town.


= Page 32 =
Survey Responses
Nurtuting our Community
     rename Services and Sustainability or something, this name is ambiguous and way to focused on
"green"


= Page 33 =
Survey Responses
Nurtuting our Community
     How about helping residents be environmentally friendly themselves - access to tools, workshops, edu-
cation, incentives.


= Page 34 =
Survey Responses
Nurtuting our Community
     here's not much in here to disagree with. I don't see the words in the circle relected in the paragraph,
though. In some ways this theme is inseparable from the others, especially Getting around, and New Places and Spac-
es.


= Page 35 =
Survey Responses
A Place for Everyone
     Is there anything you would like to add to the theme "A Place for Everyone"? Why?


= Page 36 =
Survey Responses
A Place for Everyone
     Please see my comments about community gardens in the "Good Places, New Spaces" theme above.
Af_fordable and transitional housing, as well as park facilities are ideal locations for gardens.    T_he last sentence in the
theme summary also reminds me that, as we the public participate in this process, we need to provide for and support
multiple opportunities for ongoing public participation in all aspects of our town government. I'd like to see the cre-
ation of a "Chapel Hill 101" class or program that educates citizens in participation. Here's something similar in Cha-
tham County http://www.chathamnc.org/Index.aspx?page=31  T_his might include training citizens to work in their
neighborhoods for education and increased awareness of ways to participate and support town policy, neighborhood
parks, and other initiatives (like 2020).


= Page 37 =
Survey Responses
A Place for Everyone
     1) add ".....where people of all ages AND INCOMES have access........"


= Page 38 =
Survey Responses
A Place for Everyone
     It seems right now like activities for seniors are restricted to outlying areas. T_he senior center and as-
sisted living communities are far from downtown Chapel Hill.


= Page 39 =
Survey Responses
A Place for Everyone
     Stop building high-price condominiums where one or two people live and build more af_fordable hous-
es/apartments where families can live, including those of lower incomes; expand Smith Middle School's Global Con-
nections program to other schools


= Page 40 =
Survey Responses
A Place for Everyone
     As a member of Club Nova Communities Inc., f_inding an allocation and sustainability of the mental
health community is a vital interest


= Page 41 =
Survey Responses
A Place for Everyone
     I don't understand the necessity to say playground free from commercial development. T_he Southern
Village Green is a perfect example of good green space around commercial. T_his theme seems redundant in many
areas.


= Page 42 =
Survey Responses
A Place for Everyone
     make the circle easier to read-jeez who wants to spin their head around to understand what you are say-
ing


= Page 43 =
Survey Responses
A Place for Everyone
     Focus on the benef_its of greater density w/i Chapel Hill


= Page 44 =
Survey Responses
A Place for Everyone
 new rants  immig


= Page 45 =
Survey Responses
A Place for Everyone
     I think parks & playgrounds benef_it from being near some commercial developments, specf_ically food
and drink!


= Page 46 =
Survey Responses
A Place for Everyone
     T_he developments of Greenbridge, 140, and the Franklin Hotel suggest a catering to the wealthy in
downtown Chapel Hill.  If the mission of the University is to serve the people of NC -- then we need to acknowledge
the median incomes of the 99% (to coin a phrase).


= Page 47 =
Survey Responses
A Place for Everyone
     One item discussed in Town and Gown was of_f-campus housing and the challenges it presents, espe-
cially given there does not appear to be an of_f_ice of of_f-campus housing at UNC.  I think this issue has to be handled
carefully so that the students are not victimized.    Re: the moratorium for Northside and Pine Knolls neighborhood,
I think the UNC students are being blamed for the changes and although I think all neighbors should be respectful of
neighbors and their property, I think this situation is complicated.    First, someone in these neighborhoods are selling
their homes and they are being bought by �developers,� not students.  T_he buyer is then either building or renovating
to accommodate multiple students (or renters).    Perhaps criticism should be directed at either the person selling or
the person buying. One may argue that the new residences are improving the neighborhood from an aesthetic and /
or tax assessment perspective.  Next, I think one should be careful in trying to preserve �black� neighborhoods.  I can
appreciate the intent, but this could be misconstrued that non-blacks are not welcome in these neighborhoods.    We
respect to af_fordable / workforce housing, I think we need consensus on how �af_fordable� and �workforce� are def_ined.    
I�ve talked to some who can �af_ford� to live in CH, but they chose to live in surrounding counties because they feel the
CH property taxes are too high.  So despite being able to af_ford to live in CH, they chose not to.  T_his increases the
tax burden on those who do live in CH.  Given the CH property taxes, would CH workforce and / or UNC workforce
choose to live in CH or would they choose to live in surrounding communities?  I�m not sure how this information
could be captured, but it does not appear that high-rise condos are too desirable for the workforce or families with
children.    Finally, perhaps the Community Land Trust initiative could be expanded to encourage more workforce
housing.  I understand that many graduate students (law, medical school, etc) qualify for CLT housing and although
they need to live in CH too, I�m not sure that is the intent of the CLT.


= Page 48 =
Survey Responses
A Place for Everyone
 Af_fordable g.  housin


= Page 49 =
Survey Responses
A Place for Everyone
     Free from commercial development and "blight" would be my preference.  I wold also like to see some
inclusion of safety here.


= Page 50 =
Survey Responses
A Place for Everyone
     Why "free from commercial development"?  Why does that matter?


= Page 51 =
Survey Responses
A Place for Everyone
     Teenagers need to be involved in this process more ef_fectively! My teen leadership group sent several
students to 2020 meetings, and they reported that they were ot asked any questions or given the opportunity to talk at
all-- they said they were "talked to" the entire time, on both occasions. Teens have a lot at stake in this community, and
a lot to add to the conversation. T_heir perspectives are just as important as "business" or "university"!


= Page 52 =
Survey Responses
A Place for Everyone
     I want to point out that an entry-level full-time staf_f member at UNC makes $25,000 a year. Af_fordabil-
ity is my biggest concern.


= Page 53 =
Survey Responses
A Place for Everyone
     I continue to be appalled by the invisible race discrimination protected by the term "colorblind."  T_he
racism in our community is deeply institutionalized and to develop a plan without acknowledgement of that and some
attempt to voice it in themes and discussion makes this an exercise in denial.


= Page 54 =
Survey Responses
A Place for Everyone
     this group is completely redundant with good places and new spaces... stop using ambiguous names


= Page 55 =
Survey Responses
A Place for Everyone
     ...where people of all ages, abilities and disabiliites...".  We too oten forget about the mentally ill, ad-
dicted or disabled people who are part of our community. Do we have a place for them?     Aso, our children seem to
be absent from our vision, expect for some references to families and "everyone." It really does take a whole village to
raise a child. Our 10 - 16 year olds really have frew community settings that meet the needs and interests of that age
group. Parks and Recreation does a good job for organized activities but we need a safe space for informal activites
especially from 3-7pm or think about providing opportunites for young people 10-18 to contibute to our community.


= Page 56 =
Survey Responses
A Place for Everyone
 SOUNDS   GREAT


= Page 57 =
Survey Responses
A Place for Everyone
     What "commercial development" is getting in the way of parks and playgrounds? What does that mean?  
I love the vision of including more people in the planning process, everything else in this paragraph is too vague. Of
course we protect our "assets," for example, but who gets to decide what those are?


= Page 58 =
Survey Responses
Community Prosperity
     Is there anything you would like to add to the theme "Community Prosperity and En-
gagment"? Why?


= Page 59 =
Survey Responses
Community Prosperity
     T_his is where a "boot camp" of critical studies, statistics, projections, will be essential.
Please continue to f_ind ways to educate those of us who care deeply about our town, but do not have
deep or long-term experience in these areas.


= Page 60 =
Survey Responses
Community Prosperity
     Build up and not out. NO new sales tax. It is regressive. Property tax or big box busi-
nesses is the way to go.


= Page 61 =
Survey Responses
Community Prosperity
     Something must be done to stop property tax inf_lation. It's out of control!


= Page 62 =
Survey Responses
Community Prosperity
     Also include some large "big box" stores where lower-income people shop so they
don't need to go to Southpoint, Durham to visit Walmart, K-mart, Target, etc. Fostering small busi-
nesses is excellent and should continue but their prices are of_ten beyond low-income budgets. And
most people shop at big box stores (Chapel Hill is somewhat "elitist" in that regard by keeping them
out)


= Page 63 =
Survey Responses
Community Prosperity
     We need to make Chapel more business friendly and provide developers with a more
ef_f_icient, rapid and certain path -- which need not be at odds with town prezervation and ecological
sustainability.


= Page 64 =
Survey Responses
Community Prosperity
     I like the focus on:  Economic development and job creation  Diversifying the tax base  
Fiscal sustainability for the town govt and the community at large  T_his group should stick to these
three goals and not try to do everything


= Page 65 =
Survey Responses
Community Prosperity
     T_his one is really good!


= Page 66 =
Survey Responses
Community Prosperity
     We need to balance our growth and stop allowing the vocal minority to block positive
developments in our community.  If we do not changed our path there will not be a market lef_t to cap-
ture, Durham and North Chatham will capture what is lef_t.


= Page 67 =
Survey Responses
Community Prosperity
     make the circle easier to read-jeez who wants to spin their head around to understand
what you are saying


= Page 68 =
Survey Responses
Community Prosperity
     I have heard many citizens who are much more knowledgeable than I express deep
concern about the assumptions of the economic growth models, tax value returns, etc.  T_his data
should be explicit and up-front.


= Page 69 =
Survey Responses
Community Prosperity
     T_he CH property tax bill includes Orange County taxes, CH/Carr School tax, and CH
tax.  I have friends with CH mailing addresses, but they live in either Orange, Durham, or Chatham
counties.  I understand that only one-f_if_th of people with CH mailing addresses live in CH (and pay
CH property taxes).    It is not clear to me how folks who have CH mailing addresses but who do not
pay CH property taxes contribute to the services provided by CH, if in fact they are provided CH
services given that they have a CH mailing address.      Perhaps, CH should consider annexing some
of the areas that have CH mailing addresses but who don�t pay CH property taxes. I�m not sure if this
refers to expanding the �rural bufer� but I think this should be considered. It is not sustainable for
CH residents who pay property taxes to subsidize all the services provided by CH when they are be-
ing used by others.    It is also not clear how the Orange County taxes that are paid by CH residents
are diferent from the CH taxes, especially with respect to education and services. It appears that there
are duplication of services and this is not ef_f_icient, especially in these economic times. T_his may be
na�ve, but I have asked friends and no one appears to know.  I think if people appreciated what ser-
vices they are paying for, that this would help the CH2020 initiative decide which initiatives should
be prioritized and how these will be paid for.    Finally, we discussed this at the meeting, but it is not
clear how UNC contributes to the costs of the services provided by CH including safety, f_ire, trans-
portation, parks and recreation, and environment and development.  I think this information will be
shared during the CH2020 process.


= Page 70 =
Survey Responses
Community Prosperity
     Addressing the blight of long vacant, un-used commercial property. Long standing
vacant storefronts can negatively afect the business climate.


= Page 71 =
Survey Responses
Community Prosperity
     signage, small business loans, much, much more to add


= Page 72 =
Survey Responses
Community Prosperity
     I am pretty tired of paying high property taxes and never sending a child to school.  
T_he town seems to have wanted it to be this way.  If we are to have some industrial base, we need
much more imaginative planning.  T_he proposed development on Eubanks is just more of the same-
-consuming and living.  How about some real industrial development--making things.


= Page 73 =
Survey Responses
Community Prosperity
     Prove, don't just assert that commercial growth will in fact reduce the need to increase
residential property taxes. I want to see the numbers. Every time we grow, we need more schools and
every time we build more schools, my taxes go up.


= Page 74 =
Survey Responses
Community Prosperity
     New residential development does not pay for the new services and infrastructure
required to support it.  Existing taxpayers are therefore required to subsidize the prof_its of the devel-
opers, and well as providing the new home owners town and county services, schools, etc.  I agree we
could and should encourage more business development that includes the criteria/goals noted.


= Page 75 =
Survey Responses
Community Prosperity
     rename this "Business and Innovation" but honestly this overlaps with town and gown
almost 100%, redundant and ambiguous


= Page 76 =
Survey Responses
Community Prosperity
     How will this work with Carrboro?


= Page 77 =
Survey Responses
Community Prosperity
     Most of the goals listed here (transportation, mixed-use) are actually about other
themes. What are the specif_ic economic development ideas besides incentives (of which I am not a
fan in most cases) and light industrial (which is good)? I can't believe this doesn't even mention local
ownership of businesses. Property taxes aren't just a problem for seniors.     Where is town-gown in
this theme? T_hat has a huge impact on innovation, taxes, and the whole local economy.


= Page 78 =
Survey Responses
Good Places and New Spaces
     Is there anything you would like to add to the theme "Good Places and New Spaces"? Why?


= Page 79 =
Survey Responses
Good Places and New Spaces
     T_he Town appears very opposed to sidewalk dining. WHY? It appears that many statutes (LUMO,
comp plan) were established under a previous Council with very conservative views (liberal progresives who thought
that saying NO would preserve their town as it was). Council should take more of a leadership role, to show citizens
that carefully considered change can be good for everyone. Carefully considered means a couple of public discussions
- NOT deferring decisions over and over again in favor of more discussions. CH skews very academic - large propor-
tion of professional /technical - and their Achilles heel is excessive analysis and reluctance to make decisions. Leaders
should correct for this!


= Page 80 =
Survey Responses
Good Places and New Spaces
     Community Gardens - these are "outdoor, public settings" that can be located throughout town - both
in residential and commercial areas. T_hey bring together people of all ages, cultures, abilities, and incomes. And they
enhance property values (research indicates). Plus community gardens can be a thread that weaves together many of
the prominent ideas in every theme - from places to public health to prosperity and the environment.


= Page 81 =
Survey Responses
Good Places and New Spaces
     1) Housing af_fordability should be a consideration in all neighborhoods, new and existing, to help
bridge the gap between residents of all incomes.


= Page 82 =
Survey Responses
Good Places and New Spaces
 Seems ehensive.  compr


= Page 83 =
Survey Responses
Good Places and New Spaces
     Include larger stores where lower income (and higher income, too) people shop and ask these stores to
make commitments to the community (e.g., sponsoring events, donating to scholarships)


= Page 84 =
Survey Responses
Good Places and New Spaces
     Recognize that density and quick decision making regarding development are not incompatible with
preservation and ecological sustainability


= Page 85 =
Survey Responses
Good Places and New Spaces
     T_his description of our land use needs is superf_icial and unhelpful. We need to designate locations for
higher intensity single use and mixed use development and redevelopment, in order to address the imbalance in our
tax base and to create new housing for young people and empty nesters who would like to leave their suburban type
homes but remain in Chapel Hill. T_his descirption's failure to address the potential of downtown and our major transit
corridors is a shortcoming that needs to be corrected.


= Page 86 =
Survey Responses
Good Places and New Spaces
     I'm concerned about mixed use being the answer to everything. I think it works in larger neighbor-
hoods but do not see how businesses will survive in a 100 home or less neighborhood. Really needs to be on a larger
scale like Southern Village to work.


= Page 87 =
Survey Responses
Good Places and New Spaces
     T_his theme should be refactored. Bias towards higher density removed. Other elements should be dis-
tributed into other "themes".


= Page 88 =
Survey Responses
Good Places and New Spaces
     Be reasonable with design.  Our over-regulation has not led to great design. T_he stipulations put on
private businesses and developers are af_fecting our af_fordability.  We need to work to balance our approach.


= Page 89 =
Survey Responses
Good Places and New Spaces
     make the circle easier to read-jeez who wants to spin their head around to understand what you are say-
ing


= Page 90 =
Survey Responses
Good Places and New Spaces
     Focus on the benef_its of greater density w/i Chapel Hill


= Page 91 =
Survey Responses
Good Places and New Spaces
     Who decided that we should impose a couple blocks of downtown Atlanta at 140 and University
Square?  Where is the open-space set-back from the curb ... and the placement of the taller buildings back from the
street?


= Page 92 =
Survey Responses
Good Places and New Spaces
     I am very supportive of the Ephesus Road re-development that includes Ram Plaza, Eastgate, and the
corridor along Fordham Blvd / 15-501 and that includes the service road along the vacant Volvo Dealership.    I'm
supportive of higher density in the area, but only if the traf_f_ic patterns can be addressed f_irst.  I'm concerned that the
area will be developed with mixed use before the traf_f_ic congestion is addressed.  For example, the access to Ram's
Plaza from Ephesus Church (at the Food Lion parking lot).     T_he Community Design commission recommended the
Optional Framework C.  I agree that this would be ideal.  However, given the expense associated with this plan and
the current economic condition, I would hope that other "low hanging fruit" could be considered in the short term
(ie, parts of Optional Framework A and / or B).       I support higher density, but I want to be sure that we preserve as
many trees and greenspace as possible.  Trees were noted in another presentation as a Chapel Hill strategic asset and I
thought this was a great way to refer to them.  Also, many of the Boards and Commissions were very supportive, but
also expressed concern about preserving greenways, being sensitive to the lood plain, and emphasized pedestrian and
bicycle safety.


= Page 93 =
Survey Responses
Good Places and New Spaces
     I would like to see an encouragement also on outdoor convenings - like sidewalk eating options.


= Page 94 =
Survey Responses
Good Places and New Spaces
     Can we express a priority for downtown when talking about "use our existing spaces to their fullest
potential"?  Can we also talk about signage for businesses?  And what is an industrial backdrop?  Smokestacks?  Any
industry?


= Page 95 =
Survey Responses
Good Places and New Spaces
     T_he issue of cars--there are too many will have to be addressed.  T_hey are crowding the places and
spaces.  T_his statement feels very white.  I think the institutionalized racism of our town must be addressed in every
theme.  You will have to go TO our multicultural residents to know what they think.  T_hey will not attend these intimi-
dating, intellectual settings to contribute to the mix.


= Page 96 =
Survey Responses
Good Places and New Spaces
     don't forget it all has to be af_fordable


= Page 97 =
Survey Responses
Good Places and New Spaces
     Housing.  Good places have housing.  New Spaces should have housing. Existing neighborhoods should
have the ability to add housing.  T_he NCD process is the enemy of the middle class having a future in Chapel Hill.


= Page 98 =
Survey Responses
Good Places and New Spaces
     this group overlaps like 50% with transportation, it is very ambiguous, call it Parks and Req or some-
thing and put sidewalks/greenways under transportation


= Page 99 =
Survey Responses
Good Places and New Spaces
     chapel hill feels like a bunch of small inwardly focused neighborhoods without a center or connection
between these smaller spaces.  any chance the focus could be emphasized on CONNNECTIVITY?


= Page 100 =
Survey Responses
Good Places and New Spaces
     T_his theme should be about how to channel our growth into sustainable development and redevelop-
ment that will support a lot more people while maintaining and enhancing our quality of life. T_his means targeted inf_ill
development and a commitment to make our downtown a real urban center with a dense mixture of employment,
retail, housing, and a connection to regional transit.    Why smaller communities?  What "industrial backdrop"s even
exist in Chapel Hill? (Have you noticed how revitalized urban spaces oten make excellent use of old factories and see
them as aesthetic assets?) What are "alternative" connections and how do they support people of "all incomes?" Do
neighborhoods need to be "promoted" or protected?    I'm not sure what this is trying to say and I'm even less sure I
agree with where it's going.


= Page 101 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     Is there anything you would like to add to the theme "Getting Around"? Why?


= Page 102 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     People tend to polarize on transportation - either no cars/all transit and bikes, or vice versa. T_his makes
it hard to hold a meaningful conversation with everyone participating. And the all cars/SUV suburban crowd are
not very present at CH2020 because they f_ind the other pole so unrealistic, they don't feel it's worth their time to get
involved. I feel strongly that the key to wider participation is to explore an intermediate state, that might be possible to
achieve in a reasonable period of time, and that both sides could agree has some merit. T_he SUV crowd has to start to
understand that change is necessary. And the transit crowd has to start to understand that considering an intermedi-
ate solution does not show a lack of commitment to their utopian vision.     Also - PLEASE, pay more attention to the
relationship of CH to Carrboro, Hillsboro, and the county. Joint planning is key in transportation matters.     Consider-
able education will be required to get citizens to understand that planning requires a long term perspective. 5-10 years
out is insuf_f_icient.


= Page 103 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     Ater hearing Mitch Silver, I would like to see a specif_ic mention of transportation services to our senior
citizens.  ALSO - At the f_irst meeting (ECCHS) I was in, there were strong voices for connectivity - so let's make sure
that the bike/ped facilities and the public transit systems connect to each other EASILY.


= Page 104 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     1) Social equity is enhanced by maintaing no-fare service.  2) Vehicles should be as non-polluting as
possible.


= Page 105 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     Although the bus system is good if you want to go from anywhere to UNC, right now there are limited
and infrequent ways to get to the public library and University Mall. Also, I'm a strong advocate for a light rail system
connecting Chapel Hill with Raleigh and Durham.


= Page 106 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     Not adjusting the bus schedule solely to the students but making it readily accessible for all people,
including those who work weekends and evenings


= Page 107 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     I appreciate the chance for participation in discussion of this years bus scheduling


= Page 108 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     Road maintenance is important because we need to maintain our infrastructure.


= Page 109 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     I think it is a little bit of a pipe dream. T_he car will always be #1. Also, all the transit is very expensive
and our population may not be big enough for it to be cost efective.  I also think it is silly when roads such as Colum-
bia which absolutely needs to be widen for car traf_f_ic but we choose bike lanes instead.


= Page 110 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     Factor out the elements of the theme that apply to land use policy from service questions and only
pursue those that translate to directing development decisions.  T_he service elements are important but should not be
part of the Comprehensive Plan refresh process.    Example: sidewalk requirements for developers is a LUMO consid-
eration, comprehensive transit system - unless that means providing on-site support for multi-modal transit - is not


= Page 111 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     Balance and realism


= Page 112 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     make the circle easier to read-jeez who wants to spin their head around to understand what you are say-
ing


= Page 113 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
 parking?


= Page 114 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     transportation system can accommodate and facilitate events, particularly large-scale [why: large events
that ofer bus in and out for a small fee make these much more attractive to me; I avoid if driving and parking will be
a hassle]  "true alternative to the car" - I really like that phrase [I'm a weekday commuter but can't do without my car
because of transit on weekends, holidays, late nights]  where transit or car pooling replaces the "coming of age" drive a
car to school culture in high schools [I was disappointed that my kids and their peers forsake the school bus as 'uncool'
as soon as they became of driving age]  I'll have to come back and f_inish this survey later


= Page 115 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     First, I would like to say how much I appreciate the wonderful bus service.  I take the bus daily to
campus.  I live in CH and pay CH property taxes and I am happy to contribute to the service.     While riding the bus,
in addition to students, there are people that mention that they live in Durham and/or Raleigh and drive to a park and
ride lot to catch the bus to campus.  In addition, I have colleagues at work who live in the Pittsboro area and they take
the bus to campus too.    I think CH residents need to appreciate how the surrounding counties are assisting with the
operating expenses for the bus service.  Given the number of riders from surrounding counties, I think it is important
to ensure that there is an appropriate amount contributed to the service.  If not, an alternative approach would be to
charge non-CH residents a nominal fee for the service.  T_his approach did not work for the library, but I think CH
needs to be more insistent that those people who do not pay CH property taxes assist with funding the services provid-
ed by CH.    Finally, my bus route stops at several apartment complexes.  Many people get on the bus that are not UNC
students.  Are landlords of apartment complexes contributing to the bus service through their property taxes, and if
yes, is an appropriate amount being contributed to assist with the operating expenses of the bus service


= Page 116 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     "Balanced" must include a mode mix in which the use of the automobile is made more dif_f_icult.


= Page 117 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     longer time to cross the street


= Page 118 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     Access to/from Chapel Hill to the region is important.How easy is it to get to Chapel Hill from outside
the town and get from Chapel Hill to our neighboring communities (Durham, Hillsborough, Pittsboro, etc.)? What is
the experience like? T_he main feeder routes (NC 54, 15-501, NC 86) oten experience traf_f_ic jams that can add delays.


= Page 119 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     I would like there to be more focus on providing bike lanes or bike friendly approaches on existing and
new roads, rather than "bicyclists... can enjoy neighborhoods that are connected with separate greenways and side-
walks."  T_his assumes that bikes should not be on the road.  Look at locations like Davis, CA, where bikes are as com-
mon as cars, and it's a very safe alternative to cars.


= Page 120 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     T_his really glazes over REGIONAL transit.  We will be looking at a potential 1/2 cent and light rail and
there is NOTHING mentioned about this specif_ic alternative.  We need to acknowledge what the Town will do to pro-
vide transit in and out of the Town of Chapel Hill.


= Page 121 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     Student cars.  T_he report on the Northside issue puts too many cars front and center.  T_here is no reason
a house should have more than 2 cars.  In fact, perhaps in dense neighborhoods like this, there should be outlying
parking with unloading the only reason for a car to be on a street.  Since the university only provides housing for 58%
of the undergraduate students, they need to step up to the plate with solutions.  We cannot be a "green" community
and have this many cars in the dense neighborhoods.


= Page 122 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     Good transportation does not eliminate use of cars - need to keep area assessible and include cars as
part of the plan


= Page 123 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     We should have smaller buses.  It seems like many of the buses have just a few people on them.  Big
buses cost more to maintain and operate, they wear out the roads quicker, they are more of a hazard to pedestrians.


= Page 124 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     Pricing.  If we REALLY want to increase the shares of environmentally friendly modes (transit, biking,
walking) in the area then we need to increase the costs of car-based mobility and use the proceeds of those parking
and if possible, congestion charges to the downtown core- to fund improvements for the other modes.  T_his is balanced
mobility at its best.


= Page 125 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     change the name to Transportation or something less ambiguous


= Page 126 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     Afordability. I like the free buses. All modes of transportation as tax payer subsidized so they should be
afordable by all.


= Page 127 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     Connection/transit options to the Greater Triangle - why?    1. not everyone can work in chapel hill, so
consider traf_f_ic congestion on 15-501 when making plans for transit   2. we want to make it easy for people to come
into Chapel Hill from outside the city and spend money here


= Page 128 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     I'm less interested in separate greenways and supporting suburban development, and more interested in
creating a f_ixed network of pedestrian, bicycle, and transit facilities that can inform development patterns in the future.


= Page 129 =
Survey Responses
Getting Around
     I live in Chapel Hill, but I don't live downtown.  While I support some aspects of Homegrown Hallow-
een I am bothered when the town announces that outsiders aren't welcomed, then they proceed to make it harder for
me, a Chapel Hill resident, to get downtown for that event that has a lot of tradition and history in Chapel Hill.

 

Jeff Miles's picture

Presentation is half the battle

I've been impressed with a lot of the ways that the town has tried to engage the public with the Chapel Hill 2020 process, but I wish there would be some better communication we things like this and others. Communicating what outreach is being done is half the battle so I hope to see the town publicizing what it's doing better in the future!