Northside

One UNC Student's Experience With Finding Off-Campus Housing

I signed a new housing lease about a month ago in mid-October – a lease that won’t start until June of next year. This is how competitive student off-campus housing is in Chapel Hill, and the ever-high demand for student housing in Chapel Hill continues to negatively affect non-student renters. 

UNC Students Launch Petition Against Town Housing Ordinance

Travis Crayton's picture

UNC students have launched a petition against the Town of Chapel Hill's housing ordinance prohibiting more than four unrelated people from living in the same house.

The petition is an initiative of outgoing student body president Christy Lambden. The Lambden Administration is circulating the following blurb to students concerning the petition:

As many of you know in the past year many students have been evicted from their homes for violating The Town of Chapel Hill’s Occupancy Ordinance. This Ordinance states that no more that four unrelated persons can co-inhabit the same single-dwelling residence. We in the Executive Branch of Student Government are asking for your support in signing our petition to The Town of Chapel Hill. We ask that you please circulate this to the members of your respective organizations. Stand with Student Government, fight for students and Don’t Shut the Door on Four.

http://bit.ly/M7O4sU

Also, if you have opinions or experiences with the Ordinance, please let us know at: https://neighborland.com/ideas/chapel-hill-to-hear-people-s-experien. Signing up is very easy and can be done through your Facebook account!

Thanks for your support,

The Lambden Administration

In the fall, there were reports about students being kicked out of their homes for violating the ordinance. This petition appears to be a response to those actions.

However, not all students are supportive of repealing the ordinance. A cursory glance at the Neighborland page emailed out (and seeing intense discussion on many of my friends' Facebook pages) indicates that this is a multidimensional issue that our community continues to struggle with, students fully included.  

Northside Resource Group convened to provide ideas for neighborhood conservation and diversification

Molly De Marco's picture

The Marian Cheek Jackson Center, in collaboration with UNC and Self Help Credit Union, is leading a process to develop strategies to shift the Northside neighborhood's trajectory away from increasing student housing and decreasing long-term single family housing to be more diverse (in 1980 the neighborhood was 59.3% African American and by 2010 is was down to 23.8% - data from Self Help/Jackson Center).

Civil Rights in Chapel Hill Weekend

Ruby Sinreich's picture

The Marian Cheek Jackson Center has spearheaded a whole weekend of civil rights celebrations in Chapel Hill. There are a ton of great events going on, I hope you can check some of them out.

 


 Civil Rights in Chapel Hill Celebration Weekend
November 1-3

 

Thursday

James Wallace, Keynote Address, Photographic Angles: News Photography in the North Carolina Collection

5:00 p.m. Reception and exhibition, North Carolina Collection Gallery, Wilson Library, UNC Campus
5:30 p.m. Program, Pleasants Family Assembly Room, Wilson Library, UNC Campus

Photographer Jim Wallace shares insights from his career as a photojournalist, which began in Chapel Hill when he was a student staff photographer for The Daily Tar Heel in the early 1960s. Photos of civil rights action in Chapel Hill comprise his new book Courage in the Moment: The Civil Rights Struggle, 1961-1964. For 25 years, Wallace served as director of Imaging and Photographic Services at the Smithsonian Institution.

Presented by the Center for the Study of the American South as part of its 2012-2013 James A. Hutchins Lecture Series

 

Friday 

Continuing the Struggle: Students Making History Now with Professor Tim McMillan

12:00 p.m. UNC Campus Y

 UNC students will discuss their role in making change on campus, across the street, and around the world today. What are UNC students’ particular rights, privileges, and responsibilities? What blocks or enables effective action today? What does it mean to be a student-activist? Tim McMillan, professor in the Department of African and Afro-American Studies and leader of the Black and Blue historical tour of the UNC campus will facilitate and comment. We invite you to bring lunch. Light refreshments will be served.

Sponsored by United with the Northside Community-NOW

 

These Were Real People – The Civil Rights History Project, a film showing

3:00 p.m. The Love House & Hutchins Forum, UNC Campus

In 2010, the Southern Oral History Program went national, interviewing civil rights movement veterans from California to New York for the Civil Rights History Project. These interviews reveal a civil rights movement—diverse, complex, and deeply personal—that persists to this day. The interviews, recorded on video, will be available to the public this fall in the Library of Congress. Until then, we’d like to share this short history of the movement through the voices of those who participated in it. Mandated by an Act of Congress in 2009, the Civil Rights History Project is a joint endeavor of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture and the American Folklife Center in the Library of Congress. The video is approximately 26 minutes long, and concessions (popcorn and soft drinks) will be offered at the door.

Presented by the Southern Oral History Program at UNC

 

Witness to Rights: an interactive exhibit of photos by Jim Wallace

presented by the Marian Cheek Jackson Center for Saving and Making History

4:30 p.m. Exhibit Opening, 2nd floor, St. Joseph CME Church

Exhibit continues Saturday 11:00-3:00 and Sunday 10:00-3:00

Fifty years after the major civil rights action in Chapel Hill, Wallace returned to learn the names of the people featured in his photographs. Now the pictures are coming home again, and we need your help to tell their stories. Who or what do you recognize in the photos? What were you or your father, mother, sister, cousin, pastor, friend doing at the time a photo was taken? What do you think about what these pictures show? This exhibit needs your participation: please come listen, tell, write, reflect, and enjoy. Copies of Courage in the Moment will be on sale at a discounted rate, with a big thanks to Bull’s Head Bookstore.

Presented by the Marian Cheek Jackson Center for Saving and Making History

 

Saturday

Still Walking for Justice – A Durham to Chapel Hill Walk to commemorate the 1947 Journey of Reconciliation

10:00 a.m. Send-off Rally in Durham, Corner of W. Chapel Hill and Carroll Streets

3:30 p.m. Welcome Rally in Chapel Hill, Corner of N. Columbia and Rosemary Streets

Nine teams of women will be making the walk from the Pauli Murray Historic Marker in Durham to the Journey of Reconciliation Historic Marker in Chapel Hill. The Journey of Reconciliation is considered the First Freedom Ride, when nine white and black men used non-violent direct action to test the 1946 Supreme Court Ruling desegregating interstate bus travel. This walk is for the women that were not allowed to walk in 1947, as well as local women activists who devoted their lives to advancing equality and freedom. 

Led by the Pauli Murray Project and NBJC Bayard Rustin Centennial Project

 

The Black Church and the Freedom Struggle with Bishop Thomas L. Hoyt Jr., Senior Bishop of the CME Church

1:00 p.m. St. Joseph CME Church

The Black church played an integral role in the civil rights movement during the 1960s. It provided both a safe space for rejuvenation as well as inspiration. What is the role of the Black church today? What stands should the church take on the continuing civil rights movement? Local and visiting clergy will share testimony about their experiences in ministries of liberation and change. Please come join in one of the most crucial conversations that we can have at this moment in U.S. history. Light refreshments and informal conversation to follow in the Fellowship Hall.

This event has been made possible by a generous donation by the Department of Religious Studies at UNC and the support of Pastor Lavisha Williams and St. Joseph CME Church.

 

Civil Rights Celebration Dinner featuring the Sacrificial Poets and comments by rising and resilient leaders

4:30 p.m Hargraves Recreation Center

You are cordially invited to join us in honor of people fighting for rights across our history! We’ll eat great food and revel in justice made and yet to come.

 

Ongoing

Rebecca Clark Honorary Electoral Drive

Longtime Pine Knolls resident and member at St. Paul’s, Rebecca Clark was renowned for her fierce commitment to achieving and using rights, not the least among them: the right to vote. In her honor, sign up now for rides to your voting location. Young people will be at every event, ready to help you make transportation plans for yourself, neighbors, and family members. Every vote counts. We can get you there!

Sponsored by the UNC Young Democrats

 

Living Memories Telling Stations

Have you ever marched for justice? What actually happened at Colonial Drug? What was it like to be a child or teenager during the early 60s in Chapel Hill, Carrboro? What do you think about desegregation now? What stories can you tell about the fight for rights in Chapel Hill? What’s your passion for change today?

Make YOUR story part of OUR history.

Find the telling station at each event. Take as little or as much time as you like to tell what you remember, feel, and think about local freedom struggles. Bring along a friend and share stories about yesterday and today for tomorrow.

Sponsored by United with the Northside Community-NOW 

Date: 

Thursday, November 1, 2012 - 5:00pm to Saturday, November 3, 2012 - 5:00pm

Location: 

UNC campus, downtown Chapel Hill, & Northside

Northside and Pine Knolls Community Plan to be presented to Town Council

Molly De Marco's picture

A moratorium on development in Northside and Pine Knolls was enacted this past summer. In the intervening months, staff of the Town of Chapel Hill and members of the Sustaining OurSelves Coalition have worked together to develop recommendations to curb development that is contrary to the spirit of their neighborhood conservation district strictures.

Public hearing on Northside and Pine Knolls Community Plan

Ruby Sinreich's picture

Via e-mail from the Town:

On Monday, November 21, 2011, the Town Council will hold a Public Hearing during which they will consider the adoption of the Northside and Pine Knolls Community Plan and the enactment of zoning amendments to the Northside and Pine Knolls Neighborhood Conservation Districts. The proposed Plan represents the Town and community response to the temporary moratorium in the Northside and Pine Knolls neighborhoods that was enacted by the Town Council on June 21, 2011.  I will forward the Public Hearing materials to this list prior to the meeting. 

 

Date: 

Monday, November 21, 2011 - 7:00pm

Location: 

Town Hall, 405 Martin Luther King Jr Blvd, Chapel Hill

Neighborhood Night Out and Good Neighbor Initiative Block Party

Ruby Sinreich's picture

From a Town of Chapel Hill e-mail. I love this logo!

Neighborhood Night Out

Good Neighbor InitiativeJoin your neighbors for a walk around the Northside neighborhood, proclaiming the pride you have in your community, at the Neighborhood Night Out and Good Neighbor Initiative Block Party, Tuesday, Sept. 13, a joint effort of the Town of Chapel Hill and UNC-Chapel Hill. 

Registration begins at 5 p.m., and the walk will begin at 5:30 p.m. at Hargraves Community Center, 216 N. Roberson St. Stay for the block party from 6 to 8:30 p.m., for an evening of friendship, delicious free food, live music, games, raffle prizes and more. 
Now in its eighth year, the year-round Good Neighbor Initiative encourages students who live off campus to meet their neighbors and work with them to build community and keep neighborhoods clean and safe. 

For more information, contact Aaron at bachenhe@email.unc.edu or visitdeanofstudents.unc.edu/index.php/offcampus/152-good-neighbor.html

 

Date: 

Tuesday, September 13, 2011 - 5:30pm to 8:30pm

Location: 

Hargraves Community Center, 216 N. Roberson St., Chapel Hill

BREAKING: Rioters arrested at Greenbridge

Ruby Sinreich's picture

So remember last year when I said that the people threatening violence against Greenbridge were doing more harm than good? They made a bomb threat against the building while it was under construction. Did it make Greenbridge better or cheaper or more accessible? Did it help the developers better serve the community? Did it help the community combat the rising cost of living in Chapel Hill?  No, but it probably served to make a small group of activists feel better about themselves.

Yesterday, a group of anarchists entered the lobby of Greenbridge intent on destruction. The group of over 30 demonstrators were armed with an anvil, and proceeded to do major damage to the floor, a glass table, and several pieces of artwork. Eight people were arrested Several people were detained, and three were held on felony inciting a riot charges until they were released from the Orange County Jail on a total of $8,000 bond.*

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