Biggest Stories on Orange Politics in 2013

OP Editors's picture

We thought it might be interesting to go back and see what we were talking about over the past year. Below is a smattering of the biggest topics from each month:


January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September
OP turns 10! (and here)

October

November

December

So, what do you think were the biggest stories in 2013 in Orange County? What did we miss?
Total votes: 0

6 Comments

Mark Marcoplos's picture

Landfill closure

This was a milestone in what is arguably the most bungled issue in Orange County history. The issue was kicked down the political road and swept under the leadership rug for the last 20 years and now we are wasting money trucking our waste to Durham. Additionally, we are creating more pollutants.  We wasted many opportunities to gracefully transition away from the landfill, maintain control of our waste stream, and do the right thing for the Rogers Rd. neighborhood.

Molly De Marco's picture

After much effort...a day laborer center

Not sure I posted (m)any updates about this here, but after years of work by Town of Carrboro Staff and elected officials, El Centro Hispano, and Orange County Justice United El Centro is poised to open a worker center for day laborers that they will run themselves and will provide them better, more safe working conditions. 

Waste Reduction and Reycling partnership

When Chapel Hill decided to pursue an approach to waste management, it included the very real possibility of breaking apart the very successful waste reduction/recycling program operated by the county. At one of the last meetings of the year, the council decided to stick with the county (Carrboro had made the same decision a few weeks earlier). Now that the partnership is again intact, the ongoing challenge is with rural recycling. Orange County has one of the premier waste reduction programs in the state. The fact that it has been challenged should have been a big story but it's not on the list above. Hopefully, the community will pay more attention to the continued possibility of undermining the program by changing the rural curbside program.