Civil Liberties

Perhaps because of the large number of outspoken and thoughtful people in our community, we have often found ourselves at ground zero in battles over civil liberties. In the 1980's Chapel Hill elected the first openly-gay elected official in the state, but Carrboro bested that by electing North Carolina’s first out mayor a decade later.

More recently, Chapel Hill grappled with free speech issues in the wake of 9/11, approved and then dismantled red light cameras in 2003-4, and was challenged by fundamentalists over support for gay marriage in 2005.

Earth First! Journal Tour Debate on "The Issues Are Not The Issue"

 

On Friday August 16th Internationalist Books  in Chapel Hill will host a debate/discussion at 6 p.m. regarding the new zineThe Issues Are Not The Issue” with the author (a former environmental activist)  and current organizers from Katuah Earth First! and Panagioti from the Earth First! Journal Collective.

Panagioti Tsolkas New father and current editor on the EF! Journal collective and EF! activist organizer since 1997. From 2000-2004 he was a trainer for the Ruckus Society. In 2004 he ran for the Mayor of Lake Worth, Florida. Since 2005, Tsolkas has been co-chair of the grassroots Palm Beach County Environmental Coalition, a group which files litigation regarding development issues in the Everglades and has been on the planning committee for 3 national Earth First! Organizers Conferences (2000, 2006 and 2008). In 2009, Panagioti spent 5 months traveling with the Earth First! Roadshow group. In 2010 Panagioti co-founded Uncivil Landscapes, a work collective which creates part-time income opportunities through native landscaping for local activists in South Florida. He is presently on the steering committee for the Night Heron Grassroots Activist Center in Lake Worth. Tsolkas was named ‘Troublemaker of the Year’ in 2009 and ‘Activist of the Year’ for 2010 by New Times magazine (Broward/Palm Beach edition). He has no formal education past 10th grade; he is diploma-free and proud.

Date: 

Friday, August 16, 2013 - 6:00pm

Location: 

Internationalist Bookstore 405 W. Franklin St.

Intentionally disenfranchising students (and others)

It’s about to get a lot harder to vote in Orange County, at least for some of us.

The Republican majority in the General Assembly clearly feels that the racist, anti-woman, anti-urban, and very anti-liberal redistricting which took place last year didn’t do enough to solidify their entrenched majority. Now they’re hard at work systematically disenfranchising people who are unlikely to vote for them. Stringent voter identification requirements, shortened early voting, and other impediments to voting have been proposed in the General Assembly and are all likely to pass.

But of particular note to us in Orange County is the aptly-numbered Senate Bill 666. The most significant change in SB 666 isn’t in chapter 163 which governs elections; rather, it’s a change to the tax code:

Public Address by Lawrence Lessig – Rooting out Corruption in Politics: Complicity and Complacency by the Media

I've been a huge fan of Lessig's work for some time, and I can tell you from experience that he's a really great public speaker. You'll come away smarter after listening to him.

On March 4, the Center for Media Law and Policy will host a public address by Professor Lawrence Lessig, the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership at Harvard Law School, and director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University.  Prior to rejoining the Harvard faculty, Prof. Lessig taught at Stanford Law School, where he founded the school’s Center for Internet and Society, and at the University of Chicago.

The lecture, which is free and open to the public, will tackle one of the most challenging problems we face: corruption in politics. How have good people, with good intentions, allowed our democracy to be co-opted by outside interests, weakening our institutions and especially public trust in those institutions? What role has the media played in this weakening and what should be its role going forward?

Please join us on March 4 at 6:30 p.m. at the UNC Law School when Prof. Lessig will discuss how we can root out corruption in our politics and restore faith in the Fourth Estate’s role as a watchdog of government.

 

Date: 

Monday, March 4, 2013 - 6:30pm to 8:00pm

Location: 

UNC School of Law

From Activist to Terrorist: A Discussion with Will Potter and Jake Conroy

The FBI labels animal rights and environmental activists the “number one domestic terrorism threat,” and new laws turn activism into “terrorism” if it hurts corporate profits. How did this happen? Why are undercover investigators and those who use non-violent civil disobedience being treated so disproportionately? And what are the real life consequences for the activists who are investigated, and even sent to prison, as domestic terrorists? Journalist Will Potter and activist Jake Conroy will explore these questions from first hand perspectives.

 

Date: 

Wednesday, January 23, 2013 - 7:00pm

Location: 

104 Howell Hall, UNC Campus

Carrboro Supports Free Speech on Buses

The Carrboro Board of Aldermen tonight voted unananimously to support freedom of speech on Chapel Hill Transit buses.

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