Racial & Economic Justice

March 22 IFC Food First Public Hearing

To RSVP for March 22 hearing, go here:  http://www.ifcweb.org/rsvp

Starts at 7:30 p.m.  Board Chambers Room 110 of Carrboro Town Hall

From the IFC Website: "The IFC has met with the Board of Aldermen to start the process for FoodFirst, but we need your continued advocacy and support to bring this vision to reality!  A public hearing will be held on Wednesday, March 22, 2016, and we would love to see as many friendly faces as possible to speak on behalf of FoodFirst. You can find more details about this project at www.ifcfoodfirst.org!"

Statement of Support for IFC Community Kitchen in Carrboro:

Weaver Community Housing Association would like to voice its support of the IFC locating the Food First community kitchen in downtown Carrboro.  WCHA is concerned about public safety for all of its residents and that includes those of low-income and marginalized populations.   Hence, our organization does not support criminalization of the homeless by spreading fear of panhandling and loitering.  The existence of poor residents is not a public safety issue. Tactics such as these have been used by many cities to push the poor and homeless farther out of town where they are invisibilized. We stand with the National Coalition for Homeless and their Homeless Bill Of Rights and recognize that violence and marginalization of the homeless is a national problem.

We also recognize the the Food First kitchen will be supplying groceries to many families who plan to cook meals in their homes and that a focus on fears of “idle persons” is largely unwarranted.  Roughly 1.7 million people in North Carolina live in poverty, which amounts to about 1 in 5 people.  There is an overwhelming need for centralized, community services especially now that the state of North Carolina has stopped supplying food stamps to those without work.  We also recognize that people of color disproportionately make up these affected groups at, by some estimates, roughly 78% of those who live in poverty in our state.  When we choose to make these services less accessible, we do so at a detriment to these marginalized groups.  We ask that Carrboro businesses and the town make the decision to support these community efforts downtown and stand up for those who are struggling in our communities.  We also ask for other local organizations to sign on to this statement.

Weaver Community Housing Association is a non-profit housing association that is owned and managed by low-income residents in Carrboro, North Carolina.  Our mission is to provide permanent, affordable and sustainable housing for low-income families and individuals, and to empower them to make decisions to maintain their homes and communities. See www.Wcha.coop for more info

 

Date: 

Tuesday, March 22, 2016 -
7:30pm to 10:30pm

Location: 

Room 110 Carrboro Town Hall

Come to the Hearing on March 22, 2016, to Support FoodFirst Community Kitchen in Carrboro

Weaver Community Housing Association would like to voice its support of the IFC locating the Food First community kitchen in downtown Carrboro. WCHA is concerned about public safety for all of its residents and that includes those of low-income and marginalized populations. Hence, our organization does not support criminalization of the homeless by spreading fear of panhandling and loitering.

Selma to DC March

Yesterday I was in Raleigh and joined the Selma to DC Journey for Justice March sponsored by the NAACP. Lots of supporters were there from religious groups, unions and environmental groups. (Sierra Club turned out a number of members.)  Candidates and elected officials from Chapel Hill and Carrboro were there too. I talked with the reporter from Univision. She has moved to Raleigh from Florida as did the new Sierra Club organizer. The N and O has some nice photos. The rally ended with everyone holding "Support Voting Rights Advancement Act" signs. ( An attempt to fix the changes the Supreme Court made to the Voting Rights Act.)

What We're Reading: July 10

Happy Friday! Here are a few articles from the OP Editors that we found interesting this week:

2016 Orange County Bond Referendum - For Schools Only?

This week's Indy Week features this article, documenting how affordable housing, parks, and senior services have so far been left out of the proposed 2016 Orange County bond referendum. 

When Orange County commissioners approved plans this year for a $125 million school bond vote in 2016, it passed with little public input, scant public outreach and one absent county commissioner. Now some county residents are calling for commissioners to reconsider their priorities, particularly their decision to exclude public-housing funding from the deal.

At this point, the Orange County Board of Commissioners, in a 4 to 2 votes, voted to only include funds for schools that will go before the voters in 2016.

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