Public Health & Safety

Carrboro Aldermen, County Commissioners consider Rogers Road resolutions

At their meetings last night, both the Carrboro Board of Aldermen and Orange County Board of Commissioners considered resolutions concerning the Rogers Road Task Force. The Carrboro Board of Aldermen unanimously approved a resolution expressing their support for full sewer service for all of the Rogers Road neighborhood. By contrast, the Board of County Commissioners rejected a separate resolution put forward by Commissioner Mark Dorosin that would have expressed the BOCC's intent to participate in the provision of sewer improvements. Only Dorosin and Commissioner Barry Jacobs voted in favor of the resolution.

Rogers Road Task Force Meeting-Now or Never

“The story of Rogers Road is not a new one. It is one that has been played and replayed throughout the state of North Carolina and across the country, involving different people and places. It is a story of local politics and community organizing, land-use decisions and their consequences, of the impact each of our actions has had on others whom we have never met and may never seek to find.”

-Emily Eidenier Pearce

As most know by now the folks living in the Rogers Road Community have been advocating for both the landfill to close for forty years and they have asked for specific issue to be resolved including providing water and sewer to remediate some of the impacts that the landfill has had on their community.  You might also know that the landfill will close at the end of this month.  And while the landfill closure has been a long time coming, the folks of Rogers Road's request for water and sewer has remained unmet.  We have had work groups, task forces, and meetings with residents and the Rogers Road Neighborhood Association, and still the challenge of how to provide water and sewer remains.  

On February 21st, 2012 the Board of County Commissioners agreed to create another task force, the Rogers Road Task Force, to look at funding sources for a Community Center and sewer improvements.  The first meeting of the task force was held on April 30, 2012. The task force will end in July and are tasked with providing a final report at the Assembly of Governments meeting in September.  And now, on June 12th, 2013 we will continue to discuss how to provide water and sewer to this community.  Time is running out. 

Special Topic: Traffic Impact/Improvements at Country Club Rd

On Wednesday, I attended the meeting assessing the pedestrian traffic issues along Country Club Rd.  The primary area of focus was between the Laurel Hill and Ridge Rd intersections.  The Ridge Rd intersection currently has right-of-way for Country Club Rd traffic and a stop sign for Ridge Rd traffic; however, there is much more vehicle traffic coming from Ridge Rd than Country Club.  The Laurel Hill intersection has neglible traffic apart from local neighborhood travel.

Orange County Ranks As The Second Healthiest County In The State (Again)

A WRAL report on a recent study out of the University of Wisconsin has Wake County as the healthiest county in the state.

Orange County placed a respectable second overall with first place finishes in the categories of health behaviors, clinical care, and social and economic factors and second place finishes in morbidity and mortality.  Unfortunately, our overall score was depressed by an eighth-place finish in physical environment.  I guess we know where we have our work cut out for us.

The Orange County scores are at: http://www.countyhealthrankings.org/app/north-carolina/2013/orange/county/outcomes/overall/snapshot/by-rank

Protect & Serve

Many of us were very disturbed by the Yates Building incident in Chapel Hill last year and wondered how the police were trained to deal with public events and demonstrations. How do the police do arrests? What crime and other public safety issues do we have in Chapel Hill? Well, here's a chance for you to find out how our officers are trained and what they do.  

For the last year I've been working with the Community Policing Advisory Committee and the Chapel Hill Police Department to dramatically revamp its Citizen's Police Academy. The new Academy will give participants an inside look at the police department and its work. You'll get to operate a simulator and see what it's like to respond to a domestic call that turns violent, sit in a squad car, watch the SERT and K9 teams in action, and talk to the Chief of Police about tough issues. Along the way you'll learn about the Department's work, how you can help make a safer community and much more. Participation will involve attending one evening session on April 24 or 25 as well as an afternoon session on Sun. April 28.

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