AP courses and minority enrollment

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Dear Loren Hintz,

 

Right now, based on 2013 PSAT/NMSQT® scores, there are 22 African American, Latino, and Native American students who have the potential to succeed in at least one AP® course and exam at Chapel Hill High School.

 

While these students have what it takes to succeed in AP, too many of them never consider enrolling in classes that could quite literally change their lives.

 

 

Learn more about AP Potential™

 

 

Research indicates that students who score a 3 or higher on an AP Exam typically experience greater academic success in college and are more likely to earn a college degree than non-AP students. AP Potential is a free, Web-based tool that indicates the likelihood that a student will score a 3 or higher on a particular AP Exam, based on the student's PSAT/NMSQT scores. When used in combination with other educational signposts, AP Potential can provide reliable guidance in identifying students who may be ready for the rigor of AP.

 

 I received this email for Chapel Hill High School. I am sure that the same are being sent to teachers at all the high schools. Over the years I have tried to encourage students to take honors and AP courses. Some minority students won't enroll because they don't want to be the only "minority" student in a class. Other students  won't sign up because they think the course will be too hard or too much work. Many students do sign up. It is interesting that the focus is on the probability of receiving a score of 3 or higher. I've read research that showed that even if students did not receiving a "passing" score of 3 on an AP course, just taking one improved their success in college. I'd be curious to see how enrollment has changed over the last 10 years. The AP exam is taken in May and students receive a score in the summer. Students receive an grade ( and 2 bonus points for their GPA) for the class. FYI: if you want your child to take an AP science course please encourage them to take chemistry in the 10th or 11th grade. 

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