History

Merritt Crossing Redux

Yesterday I received a call from a woman who lives in a tent she assembled in the woods east of the railroad tracks near land that Chapel Hill purchased from the estate of Leo Merritt. I have known her for several years and she has been a part of the downtown Carrboro community for a long time. I had mixed emotions about what she had to say. She is moving next month to be with another member of her family in a nearby state. On the one hand, I am happy for her that she will (presumably) have more formal housing arrangements, but on the other hand I will miss seeing her around Carrboro.

16th Annual Conference on Race, Class, Gender, and Ethnicity

The Conference on Race, Class, Gender, and Ethnicity would like to announce its 16th Annual Conference, “Waking Up from the American Dream: The Sober Reality of Class in America.” On Saturday, February 25th, 2012, academics, community activists, practitioners, and students will come together at the UNC School of Law Rotunda to contribute to the rejuvenation of a discussion of class and inequality. We hope to encourage a heterodox approach grounded in the intersection of an honest exploration of class and the realities of racial, feminist, ethnic, and queer identities and the law. For more information and to register please visit our website, http://studentorgs.law.unc.edu/crcge/conferences/2012/default.aspx.

Date: 

Saturday, February 25, 2012 - 9:00am to 5:00pm

Location: 

UNC School of Law, Van Hecke-Wettach Hall, 160 Ridge Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3380

SWAT, Interlopers, and a Lingering Sense of Bias: Lack of Political Leadership, or Incompetent Governance?

When Being "the Man" Ain't So Easy: Satyagraha, Yates Motors and the Greensboro Massacre

I spent most of Sunday afternoon out at the Haw River just outside the mill village of Swepsonville about five miles upstream of Saxapahaw.  I managed to enjoy most of my time out there even though I was there was because I have been having trouble there with trespassers.  The land I own out there is the hydro-electric power plant that formerly powered the cotton mill in Swepsonville.

My hydro-electric plant has been out of operation for about 40 years and the windows in the building are almost completely broken out.  Inside the building are huge, deep holes in the floor where the generators once sat atop the turbines.  I have been gradually working on making the interior of the building safer by covering over the huge holes in the floor, but the building is definitely not a safe place for unwary visitors.

November Fifth

In 1991, as a 20 year-old rising Senior at the University of North Carolina, I did the most outlandish and absurd thing I have ever done in my life.

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