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Seriously Creative Thinking for County Fund-raising Needed

After last night's defeat of the 1/4 cent sales tax we're really under the gun. A number of important community services could be cut. We could witness the closing of libraries, crippled EMS, county employee layoffs, cuts to school budgets, and more. So what are the Commissioners going to do to fill the budget gaps and invest in the future?

Now is the time for some seriously creative thinking. I know the County Manager, Staff, and Commissioners have been thinking about this hard. But what would you do? How would you raise one time or recurring funds to keep the lights on?

Things for which I am grateful

So I am embarrassed to admit that before the festivities at home begin, here I am on OP writing a little something on Thanksgiving. We have a thread about things we should tax. Today I propose a thread about things we like, things we think are just fine the way they are, things not deserving of a special tax, and people do something nice. So I'll start the ball rolling....

I'm thankful for OP and Ruby, for this site doesn't run itself.

I'm thankful for the many misguided souls who don't agree with me on this site. You're fun.

I'm thankful for Fred Black because he challenged people with grace. I miss Fred. I wish he would post again.

I'm thankful that I live in Chapel Hill and it's next door to Carrboro.

I'm thankful for town officials and employees.

I'm thankful for the deer that graze with abandon in my yard.

Happy Thanksgiving, you guys. 

 

Halloween on Franklin Street.

I have some great pictures  of halloween. A man dressed as Jesus and he was beautiful, a man dressed as a peacock, Vampire pics, MIchael Jackson, Nerds, etc.  if anyone wants copys I can email them to you. Thank you Chapel Hill I had a great time at your party on Franklin Street - best ever.

cindychauvie@yahoo.com

Book Discussion: The Forever War

Join us for a discussion of The Forever War by Pulitzer Prize winning author Dexter Filkins. This book won the National Book Critics Circle Award and was chosen as one of the best books of the year by The New York Times, The Washington Post, USA Today, and Time magazine. Copies of the book are available at the Cybrary for borrowing.

Book Description:
From the front lines of the battle against Islamic fundamentalism, a searing, unforgettable book that captures the human essence of the greatest conflict of our time. Through the eyes of Dexter Filkins, the prizewinning New York Times correspondent whose work was hailed by David Halberstam as “reporting of the highest quality imaginable,” we witness the remarkable chain of events that began with the rise of the Taliban in the 1990s, continued with the attacks of 9/11, and moved on to the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Filkins’s narrative moves across a vast and various landscape of amazing characters and astonishing scenes: deserts, mountains, and streets of carnage; a public amputation performed by Taliban; children frolicking in minefields; skies streaked white by the contrails of B-52s; a night’s sleep in the rubble of Ground Zero. We embark on a foot patrol through the shadowy streets of Ramadi, venture into a torture chamber run by Saddam Hussein. We go into the homes of suicide bombers and into street-to-street fighting with a battalion of marines. We meet Iraqi insurgents, an American captain who loses a quarter of his men in eight days, and a young soldier from Georgia on a rooftop at midnight reminiscing about his girlfriend back home. A car bomb explodes, bullets fly, and a mother cradles her blinded son.

Like no other book, The Forever War allows us a visceral understanding of today’s battlefields and of the experiences of the people on the ground, warriors and innocents alike. It is a brilliant, fearless work, not just about America’s wars after 9/11, but ultimately about the nature of war itself.

Starred Review from Publisher's Weekly:
Filkins, a New York Times prize–winning reporter, is widely regarded as among the finest war correspondents of this generation. His richly textured book is based on his work in Afghanistan and Iraq since 1998. It begins with a Taliban-staged execution in Kabul. It ends with Filkins musing on the names in a WWI British cemetery in Baghdad. In between, the work is a vivid kaleidoscope of vignettes. Individually, the strength of each story is its immediacy; together they portray a theater of the absurd, in which Filkins, an extraordinarily brave man, moves as both participant and observer. Filkins does not editorialize—a welcome change from the punditry that shapes most writing from these war zones. This book also differs essentially from traditional war correspondence because of its universal empathy, feelings enhanced by Filkins's spare prose. Saudi women in Kabul airport, clad in burqas and stylish shoes, bemoan their husbands' devotion to jihad. An Iraqi casually says to his friend, Let's go kill some Americans. A marine is shot dead escorting Filkins on a photo opportunity. Iraqi soldiers are disconcerted when he appears in running shorts (They looked at [my legs] in horror, as if I were naked). Carl von Clausewitz said war is a chameleon. In vividly illustrating the varied ways people in Afghanistan and Iraq have been affected by ongoing war, Filkins demonstrates that truth in prose.

"Already a classic–it has the timeless feel of all great war literature. Dexter Filkins’s combination of courage and sensitivity is so rare that books like his come along only once every major war. This one is ours." ~ George Packer, author of The Assassins’ Gate: America in Iraq

“Filkins confronts the absurdity of war head-on. . . . This is a page-turner, and one of the most astounding books yet written about the war in Iraq.” ~ Time

“The best war reportage you are apt to read in a lifetime.”
~ The Washington Times

Date: 

Tuesday, November 17, 2009 - 2:00pm

Location: 

Carrboro Cybrary, 100 N. Greensboro St.

FREEDOM WORKS


I am a volunteer and the spokesman for Orange County FreedomWorks.  I was contacted by a citizen concerned about inaccuracies on this site about Tax Revolt and FreedomWorks.  I thought it might be a good idea to attempt to correct some of the inaccuracies by providing information.

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